Takeaways make up a smaller slice of Northamptonshire's food outlets than in 2010

The proportion of takeaways in Northamptonshire has fallen since 2010.
The proportion of takeaways in Northamptonshire has fallen since 2010.

The proportion of fast food outlets in Northamptonshire is dwindling, according to new research, in a sign the county is slowly falling out of love with the takeaway.

Recent research by the British Medical Journal, which suggested exposure to too many pizza and fried-food outlets could nearly double a person's chances of obesity, prompted town halls across the UK to get tough on takeaways through stricter planning rules.

And a new study by the BBC Shared Data Unit has found some areas are not getting to grips with the problem - with their figures showing a 34 per cent rise in takeaways UK-wide.

In 2018, in 46 areas out of 215, fast food outlets represented more than 50 per cent of all food outlets, with Blaenau Gwent, on top of that scale on 73 per cent.

But Northamptonshire appears to be fairing competitively well.

In 2010 takeaways made up 48 per cent of all eateries in the county - but in 2018, that proportion fell to 44 per cent even though the overall number of takeaways rose from 310 to 375.

Dr Alison Tedstone, chief nutritionist at Public Health England, said: “Many councils are challenged with striking the balance between a vibrant high street and a healthy one.

“However, it’s difficult to make healthier choices when our neighbourhoods are saturated with takeaways, restaurants and cafes.

“Everyone has a role in tackling obesity. Councils can help address the growth of fast food outlets and we’re working with the food and drink industry to make everyday products healthier.”

While the proportion of takeaways per 100,000 people in Northamptonshire has risen marginally from 48 to 52 over the past eight years - it is still a long way short of Westminster, which has 127 takeaways per 100,000 inhabitants, and Blackpool, which has 97.