Northampton hospice nurse plunged 13,000 ft in charity skydive to raise £2,500 for cancer patients

A Northampton hospice is currently recruiting adrenaline junkies to take part in a UK-wide charity skydive, in a bid to raise money for patients undergoing end-of-life treatment.

Tuesday, 9th January 2018, 2:51 pm
Updated Tuesday, 9th January 2018, 10:49 pm
Sarah works for Cynthia Spencer Hospice and decided to take the plunge after her patient urged her to take on the skydiving challenge.

Sarah Stride faced her fears in September 2016 and plunged a terrifying 13,000ft from a plane to raise £2,500 for Cynthia Spencer Hospice, after a patient she was treating with motor neurone disease spurred her on.

Now the hospice is currently recruiting thrill-seekers to take part in June’s momentous UK-wide Summer Solstice Skydive - as part of their #jump4cynthia campaign - where hundreds of fundraisers will take to the skies at airfields across the country in a synchronised parachute jump.

Sarah, who communicates with hert, said: "When the hospice volunteer brought round leaflets promoting #jump4cynthia, she [the patient] wrote ‘you should do this’ and I replied ‘I can’t think of anything worse’ and then realised what I’d just said considering how much she was suffering, and I just signed up.

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Sarah flew through the air to raise thousands of pounds for her poorly patients.

"I’m in total awe and feel so humble compared to the people I care for. The struggle they go through and the fight they give on a day- to-day basis astounds me so this, in comparison, is nothing.

“I’m terrified of heights so this was a huge deal for me. The wonderful result was that I raised so much money for an amazing place.”

To sign up for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, call Sarah Denston, events fundraiser on 01604 973346 or email [email protected] You can also find out more by visiting www.cynthiaspencer.org.uk/challenge-event/summer-solstice-skydive

Sarah flew through the air to raise thousands of pounds for her poorly patients.