The 10 things you don't see in Northampton anymore that you could a decade ago

Northampton has seen huge change over the last ten years.

Friday, 23rd November 2018, 2:27 pm
Updated Tuesday, 8th January 2019, 4:50 pm
Going, going, gone...the former Northampton Chronicle & Echo building was completely demolished in 2014. The building in Upper Mounts, which first opened in 1978, has now been knocked down to make way for Aldi. We remember it well...
Going, going, gone...the former Northampton Chronicle & Echo building was completely demolished in 2014. The building in Upper Mounts, which first opened in 1978, has now been knocked down to make way for Aldi. We remember it well...

Everyone remembers sticky dance floor nights, top value pick'n'mix and cheap pints at some of Northampton's most nostalgic haunts. Although we shall always remember them fondly, the town has changed in many other ways over the years from new bars and top restaurants on Wellingborough Road to the new all-singing-all-dancing students union bar, The Platform in George Row. Here's a look at some familiar stomping grounds over the last decade as our gallery showcases.

Going, going, gone...the former Northampton Chronicle & Echo building was completely demolished in 2014. The building in Upper Mounts, which first opened in 1978, has now been knocked down to make way for Aldi. We remember it well...
Everyone's favourite father and son Indian restaurant, The Royal Bengal, in Bridge Street - which was initially opened back in 1975 - served up its last meal in May last year. The restaurant raised 62,700 through charity nights held at the venue, over a 40 year period, for local causes.

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The late and popular Fat Cat Cafe Bar in Bridge Street was ravaged by fire in 2012, but conservation body Historic England wants to see parts of the original building retained, even though they are in a derelict state and need supporting by scaffolding. Plans for the ground floor of the hotel, submitted this year, show space for two restaurants, one bar, and two retail spaces. There is a further area marked as a possible wine bar or extra retail outlet.
All good things, they say, must come to an end. And for hundreds of champions of new music across Northampton, The Soundhaus was a very good thing indeed. The Upper Mounts venue, which shut in 2008, constantly backed local talent, giving wide-eyed, aspirational youngsters their chance to shine as well as hosting big names like the Arctic Monkeys, The Killers and The Ting-Tings.
It was a cold and dry day on the morning March 15, 2015 as the town came together to watch the old iconic Greyfriars Bus Station be demolished. The Greyfriars building, which was last used by passengers in 2014, collapsed as the town looked on and was followed by a huge cloud of dust that lingered before revealing mountains of newly-blasted concrete. It was the first time the site has lain empty of buildings since 1976.
Abington Street's Woolworths store closed for the last time in 2009. The shop which occupied a prime town centre spot in Northampton's busiest shopping street is now a Tesco Metro. The department store was best known for its Ladybird children's clothing range and pick'n'mix.
Favourite pre-drinking spot and lunchtime watering hole The 'Moon on the Square' pub, owned by Wetherspoon, closed on March 19 last year before it was put up for sale. The Moon on the Square, which was on the northern edge of Northampton Market Square, opened in 1996 following a pub conversion.
The Chicago Rock Cafe on Northampton's Market Square closed its doors in 2010. The club created 120 new jobs when it opened in 1997, providing the town with a venue with a capacity of 1,000 people and a 200-seat restaurant. It's predecessor, Balestra, was put on the market in 2013 for 1.1 million, just two-and-a-half years after its owners ploughed 250,000 into re-fitting the venue.
Every child of the 90s and noughties remembers trips to the The Disney Store in Northampton before the magical shop for youngsters closed in 2013. Vision Express then opened in 2016 in the unit on the second floor of the Grosvenor Centre opposite Boots and WHSmith.
House of Fraser once dominated the Grosvenor Centre, after taking over Beatties, before it closed down in February 2014. The shop now both hosts a Primark and a Next.