Sewage and surface water from 140-home development 'will not add to flood risk' for Northampton streets below

Barry Howard says his 140-home development will 'not add to the flood risk' for neighbourhoods downhill of Lancaster Way.
Barry Howard says his 140-home development will 'not add to the flood risk' for neighbourhoods downhill of Lancaster Way.

A housing developer hopes to allay fears that his plans for 140 houses in Northampton will not cause more flooding problems for existing homes further down the hill.

A report into the floods that hit St Leonard's Road published this week ruled the neighbourhood's drains and sewers were not capable of handling the pressure when a month's worth of rain fell in two hours in May 2018.

The plans for the development in Lancaster Way were approved in late 2018.

The plans for the development in Lancaster Way were approved in late 2018.

But after the report, Conservative councillor Graham Walker told the Chronicle & Echo he feared a development for 140 homes in Lancaster Way - under a mile uphill from St Leonard's Road on Towcester Road - would put even more pressure on the sewers when finished.

He said: "I'm afraid the development on Lancaster Way will add to what goes downhill into Far Cotton's sewers. The drains couldn't handle the storm as it was. I think it will make things worse and it will happen again."

The report also makes a recommendation that any new developers near St Leonard's Road 'do not increase flood risk'.

Now, developer Barry Howard for Barry Howard Homes and Xcite Projects hopes to allay fears his 140-home housing project will not make the situation worse.

St Leonard's Road was flooded in May 2018.

St Leonard's Road was flooded in May 2018.

He said: "We work with the lead local flood authority [Northamptonshire County Council] and this site has massive storm cell holding capabilities and underground stormwater storage. It also has a Hydro-Brake system to hold the water back and release it at a much slower pace.

"The stormwater and sewage water are separate pipework systems so that makes no difference to the flows of sewage."

Mr Howard also assured his development 'followed al guidance and requirements' for handling surface water and sewage.

In May 2018, filthy floodwater poured into the homes, businesses and takeaways of St Leonard's Road when a sudden thunderstorm unleashed a month's worth of rain in two hours.

The report - which is the first of 15 that will be produced for the different areas of Northampton affected - says the floods would have hit St Leonard's Road 'regardless' as the street's drains were not fit to handle the sudden downpour.