Northampton marathon runner has cut the ‘size of tennis ball’ after being knocked over by cyclist at Pitsford

Sabirah Shefta suffered a deep cut to her knee after she was knocked over by a cyclist
Sabirah Shefta suffered a deep cut to her knee after she was knocked over by a cyclist

A woman may be unable to compete in her first London Marathon after she was knocked over by a cyclist and suffered a deep cut “the size of a tennis ball” on a leg.

Sabirah Shefta, of Harpole, was close to completing her last long training run at Pitsford Water on Easter Sunday at 3.30pm, when a cyclist came up behind her and caused her to lose her balance.

The 27-year-old struck her leg against a large rock as she fell to the floor and suffered a deep cut below a knee.

Although the cyclist did not stop, Ms Shefta was helped by another cyclist and two people who were walking round the reservoir at the time.

An ambulance was called and Ms Shefta was taken to Northampton General Hospital. The injury to her leg required eight stitches.

Chris Masters, Ms Shefta’s partner, said he was “furious” the cyclist had ridden off without stopping to check if she was okay.

Accidents do happen but you don’t just leave people stranded.

Chris Masters

He said: “I think he could have offered an apology. Accidents do happen but you don’t just leave people stranded.

“There is also the knock-on effect. She has been building up to the marathon for the past year and she has not been able to go to work this week.

“I also took a day off work and this incident could have messed up her last 12 months’ training,” he added.

Ms Shefta, who has run the Great North Run half marathon five times but never run a marathon, said she did not believe she had been injured deliberately by the cyclist.

She said: “I think it was one of those things. He may not have realised he had knocked me over. I think I fell on the largest rock in Pitsford.”

Ms Shefta said she was still hoping to take her place in this year’s marathon and was hoping to raise £1,500 for Health Poverty Action, an international organisation helping to strengthen the health of poor and marginalised people.

She said: “I will find out in nine days time whether I can run when they take the stitches out. It was just soft tissue damage and I didn’t damage any tendons or bones.

“If I can’t take part I will defer my place for next year.”