Kingsthorpe College bans mobile phones to support student mental health

Kingsthorpe College says while they recognise the positives of phones they aren't always used in right ways.
Kingsthorpe College says while they recognise the positives of phones they aren't always used in right ways.

Kingsthorpe college has put a stop to students using their phones in school time after a large number of parents have voiced their concerns.

During debates in tutor time and meetings with the school council, Student Voice, bosses at the school said it soon became clear that a number of students and parents were worried about pupils using their phones.

Students made mention of how antisocial and bullying behaviour can arise through the posting of harmful comments, pictures, videos and messages and they touched on the detrimental effect and pressures that social media can have on young people’s self-esteem and mental health.

Headteacher Mrs Giovanelli said: "Our focus on significantly raising standards and expectations is balanced alongside the paramount need to safeguard all within the school community.

"This has subsequently led us to reflect on the often-damaging role that mobile phones can play in our students’ school day and the negative impact they can have on teaching, learning, behaviour and mental health."

As a result of the feedback, Kingsthorpe College has implemented a ‘mobile technology’ free zone on its college site where phones are switched off and out of sight in school bags.

Ms Eddy assistant headteacher and the designated safeguarding lead for the college said: "We firmly believe that giving students a break from constant updates and messages, will not only improve academic progress and outcomes, but will also support safety and benefit their social skills, fostering an environment of positive communication and interaction with peers and adults."

Since the implementation this week Kingsthorpe College has seen a "very positive" response from both students and parents and is confident that this will continue in September.

Bosses say research has shown that this outcome will improve grades across the board and lower achieving students, and those from lower income families, showed the greatest gains.