Jury hears defence barristers' final arguments in Northampton teenager's murder trial

Liam Hunt was stabbed to death in February last year.
Liam Hunt was stabbed to death in February last year.

Defence barristers in the trial over the stabbing of a Northampton teenager have made their last speeches to convince the jury their clients are not guilty of murder.

After 10 weeks, the trial of seven young men over the killing of Liam hunt in February last year is drawing to an end.

The closing statements in the murder trial of Liam Hunt are being heard at Northampton Crown Court.

The closing statements in the murder trial of Liam Hunt are being heard at Northampton Crown Court.

Barristers for five of the defendants have now used their closing statements to ask the jury to clear their clients of murder, manslaughter and violent disorder.

Kane Allaban-Hamilton, 18, from Camp Hill, is accused by prosecutor Mr John Lloyd-Jones QC of inflicting the seven-centimetre stab wound to Liam's neck in a "savage" attack.

His defence barrister, Mr Michael Mather-Lees QC, has argued his case around Allaban-Hamilton's admission that he pushed the knife into Liam's neck - in an act of self-defence after Liam attacked with a knife.

Witnesses have claimed that Aaron Joseph, 20, from London, shouted "give me my ting" during the knife fight before stabbing Liam in the leg.

Seven boys have been on trial for murder since February 2018

Seven boys have been on trial for murder since February 2018

His defence lawyer, Mr Benjamin Aina QC, said: "There is no credible evidence that Joseph participated in the death of Liam Hunt.

"While he was present, he did nothing, said nothing and did not encourage anyone to do anything."

The prosecution's case has centred on James Dodd, 19, from Northampton, as the one who brought the group to St George's Street to seek revenge on Liam after losing a fistfight with him two days earlier.

Evidence in the trial has pointed to the idea that none of the group even like Dodd and "wouldn't lift a finger" to help him, and lagged behind the group as they walked to St George's Street.

Dodd's defence barrister, Mr Naeem Mian QC, said: "The Crown has to have something to pin their case on and say [revenge] is the motive because [their case] just doesn't make sense.

"You may think this pathetic individual, this stupid boy, has got himself caught up... you can conclude that James Dodd is not guilty of murder."

Mr Richard Carey-Hughes QC - defence barrister for Lee Warren, 18, from Queen's Park - says his client's involvement was to throw a brick and miss a punch he threw at one of Liam's friends - which does not make him guilty of murder.

He said: "[My client thought] this was a group of lads looking to get into a commonplace [fistfight]. There was no plan, no armoury, no serious grudge. It may be that one or more of them had knives... but if so, where is the evidence that one of them was Lee Warren?"

During the trial, one of the seven boys - who cannot be named because of his age - was cleared of murder or manslaughter.

His defence barrister, Mr David Nathan QC, asked the jury to also find him not guilty of violent disorder and said there was "no credible evidence" he was involved in the fight.

The jury is expected to be sent out to deliberate before the end of the week.