Fundraiser to save last surviving landmark of former Northampton town centre high school run by nuns launches in April

The former Northampton Notre Dame High School has one surviving landmark - the Sisters of Notre Dame Cemetary, off Albert Place.
The former Northampton Notre Dame High School has one surviving landmark - the Sisters of Notre Dame Cemetary, off Albert Place.

Not much remains of the former all-girls Northampton Catholic high school that once stood in the town centre in Abington Street.

Northampton Notre Dame High School was sadly demolished in 1979 to make way for the town's growing high street.

The former school used to dominate Northampton town centre, as shown here after it was demolished. Abington Street, as it was in 1979, can be seen beyond the wreckage.

The former school used to dominate Northampton town centre, as shown here after it was demolished. Abington Street, as it was in 1979, can be seen beyond the wreckage.

But a fundraiser has now been launched to restore the only landmark left of this historic school - the Cemetary of the Sisters of Notre Dame, just off Albert Place.

The final resting place for many of the nuns who taught the school is now the only surviving piece of this chapter in the town's history. But it has fallen into disrepair in recent years.

Now, a fundraising event will launch next month to restore and preserve this historic landmark.

Margaret Bradbury, President of the Notre Dame Association, said: “Our aim is to make this site a worthy memorial to the work of the Sisters in this town and we would hope that, by providing information boards, etc; we would, in the future, be able to see the site placed on Northampton’s Heritage Trail".

Workmen begin to knock down the school in 1979.

Workmen begin to knock down the school in 1979.

The Northampton Notre Dame Association, made up of former students to remember their school, is working with the borough council to hold a fundraising afternoon tea at The Guildhall on Apil 21.

A range of old school memorabilia, as well as plans for improving the site, will also be on display in the Court Room throughout the afternoon.

The event will be opened by the Mayor of Northampton, followed by a number of speakers including Canon Mark Floody of the Diocese of Northampton and the Lord-Lieutenant, David Laing.

The Northampton Notre Dame Association will be accepting donations on the day and have set up a Local Giving page for anyone wanting to donate towards the project.

The Cemetary of the Sisters of Notre Dame is now the only surviving landmark from the school.

The Cemetary of the Sisters of Notre Dame is now the only surviving landmark from the school.

Notre Dame High School was a significant landmark in Northampton for more than 100 years, running from next door to Marks and Spencer to the building now occupied by Radio Northampton.

The sisters of Notre Dame had been running the school for 123 years when it closed its doors in 1975.