Speeding driver jailed for killing Stephen Swann in 'heartbreaking' Northampton hit-and-run crash

Mohammed Rahman (left) was jailed for killing Stephen Swann in a hit-and-run crash. Photo: Northamptonshire Police
Mohammed Rahman (left) was jailed for killing Stephen Swann in a hit-and-run crash. Photo: Northamptonshire Police

A driver who killed a pedestrian in a hit-and-run crash in Northampton and tried to cover up his tracks was jailed this afternoon (Monday, September 16).

Mohammed Rahman pleaded guilty to being responsible for Stephen Swann's death at Northampton Crown Court on September 3, on what would have been the first day of his trial.

Flowers were left where Stephen Swann was killed in a hit-and-run crash on Wellingborough Road last year

Flowers were left where Stephen Swann was killed in a hit-and-run crash on Wellingborough Road last year

The 21-year-old, of St James Park Road was sentenced to 26 months in prison at Northampton Crown Court after admitting to causing death by careless driving and perverting the course of justice.

Sentencing him, his Honour Judge Rupert Mayo said: "You were driving too fast for the conditions and too fast to see what you should have seen."

Stephen was crossing Wellingborough Road at around 11.40pm on Sunday, May 20, 2018, when Rahman hit him with his Vauxhall Corsa at an "excessive" speed, estimated to be at least 20mph over the 30mph speed limit.

Despite the best efforts of two of his close friends and a doctor who witnessed the collision, and the emergency services, the father-of-one died at the scene having been "thrown into the air", the court heard.

But instead of stopping, Rahman not only drove off without trying to help Stephen, but abandoned his car half-a-mile away from the scene, despite having two passengers in the damaged car with him.

He then cleaned the exterior and interior of his Corsa, wiping it down and removing its number plates in an effort to destroy evidence, which the judge described as "wicked".

After returning home, Rahman's sister called the police a few hours later and he was arrested.

However, he replied "no comment" in every interview he gave with police, only admitting he was driving by filling in an official form.

Rahman was initially charged with causing death by dangerous driving, but admitted the lesser charge of careless driving, which was accepted by the Crown Prosecution Service.

In a statement read out by the prosecution lawyer, Stephen's sister said his family and friends have been left "devastated" and "heartbroken" by the loss of the 39-year-old, of Links View.

She added that the court proceedings have exacerbated his parents' ill health and given his eight-year-old daughter "a great deal of anxiety".

Rahman's defence lawyer said: "Mr Rahman is truly and deeply sorry for what he has done and to be the cause of so much pain for Stephen's family."

"He's going to regret the actions of last May for the rest of his life," he added.

After the hearing, Detective Sergeant Mahesh Patel, from Northamptonshire Police’s serious collision investigation unit, said: “Mohammed Rahman knew he had hit someone that night but instead of stopping, he left Stephen in the middle of the road before making the calculated decision to try and destroy any evidence linking him to the crime.

“When he struck Stephen, Rahman was driving at a speed well above the speed limit, causing injuries that were so catastrophic that Stephen died at the scene, and at court today we heard from both the prosecution and the judge that Rahman’s driving was extremely careless and not far short of dangerous.

“The devastation Rahman’s actions have caused cannot be measured, as Stephen leaves behind an eight-year-old daughter and two parents, siblings, family and friends, who all thought the absolute world of him.

“I hope Rahman reflects on this this evening and I hope he is aware that his actions on that night in May have left Stephen’s loved ones completely and forever heartbroken."

As well as the custodial sentence, Rahman was also disqualified from driving for 42 months.