Jail term of more than 11 years for Daventry drug dealing trio over cocaine, amphetamine and cannabis conspiracy

Swain, Baker and Lee pleaded guilty to distributing narcotics between February 2019 and October 2020

Tuesday, 26th October 2021, 10:31 pm
Updated Wednesday, 27th October 2021, 9:32 am

Three Daventry drug dealers who conspired to sell cocaine, amphetamine and cannabis were given jail sentences totalling more than 11 years at court on Tuesday (October 26).

Jordan Swain, Sophie Baker and Richard Lee pleaded guilty to distributing the narcotics between February 2019 and October 2020 at Northampton Crown Court.

Detective Inspector Nick Cobley, from Northamptonshire Police’s serious and organised crime team, said: “Jordan Swain acted like so many drug dealers, thinking that he could do what he wanted and not face the consequences of his actions.

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Jordan Swain and Sophie Baker. Photos: Northamptonshire Police

"These individuals falsely believe they’re untouchable and believe they’re too clever to ever get caught. In reality, nobody is untouchable, especially not Jordan Swain.

“There is no place in our communities for those who deal drugs, exploit the vulnerable and fuel the wider criminality and societal decline associated with drugs.

"This was a detailed investigation and I wish to commend the team for their efforts and the determination shown to bring Swain and his associates to justice.

“I hope this case shows the seriousness with which the serious and organised crime team operate to take down drug dealers. Ultimately, If you deal drugs, we will catch up with you.”

Swain was described as the main member of the conspiracy to sell drugs in Northamptonshire and told the others what to do and operated three mobile phones.

The 27-year-old man, of Admiral Way, had payments of £90,000 in his bank account and withdrew £45,000 in cash as part of the operation to sell around 1kg of drugs.

His Honour Judge Rupert Mayo said a 'heart-warming' report on Swain showed 'massive clarity of thought' but Covid-19 has stymied his chances to take courses to address his offending.

He was jailed for four years and 10 months - he has been on remand in prison since December last year and is awaiting a drugs and firearms trial at Warwick Crown Court.

Baker controlled stock, kept a 'tick-list' - a check list of who owed them money for drugs - and was the custodian of significant amounts of cash, the court heard.

James Gray, defending, said the 36-year-old has moved herself and her two 11-year-old children to Southlands Road, Weymouth, from Oriel Road to 'get away' from her old life.

She used to deal drugs to fund her amphetamine addiction as she could not work due to an accident and having fibromyalgia, the lawyer added.

Since moving to Dorset, Baker has been clean, not been in touch with her old acquaintances and her children have settled into life in a new town and at a new school.

"They are at a critical stage in any human life and yes she should have thought of this when dealing drugs but it's not the children's fault but they will be the ones who suffer the greatest impact," he said.

"They are in a new town, a new school, they've got their mum now but could not have her tomorrow.

"It wouldn't be possible to criticise that decision but given they've made a new start and the children are at a stage when they really need their mother, is it right that further burden be placed on social services by imprisoning her?"

Judge Mayo said he understood the impact jailing Baker would have on her children but still sentenced her to four years and three months in prison, telling her: "Your offending was significant."

Lee was controlled by Swain and Baker to control the drugs, the judge said, so he was considered to have a much lesser role in the conspiracy.

Graham Blower, defending, said the 36-year-old man, of Buckfast Close, had started dealing drugs after he and his wife lost their jobs as taxi drivers.

Judge Mayo sentenced him to two years in prison, suspended for two years, and ordered him to complete 80 hours of unpaid work and 15 rehabilitation activity requirement days.