Coroner confirms star of Northampton's 'Death of a Salesman' died of natural causes

There will be no inquest for the lead actor of a Northampton play who died three days before premiere night in April.

Tuesday, 2nd May 2017, 11:52 am
Updated Tuesday, 9th May 2017, 7:06 pm
Timothy Pigott-Smith, 70, died in April.
Timothy Pigott-Smith, 70, died in April.

Timothy Pigott-Smith OBE, 70, was billed as the lead role in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman at the Royal & Derngate Theatre.

But the 70-year-old actor was found dead at a private address in Northampton on April 7, three days before opening night.

HM coroner's office has ruled that Mr Pigott-Smith died of natural causes and will not hold an inquest into his death.

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He was billed to star in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman at the Royal & Derngate Theatre.

A statement released by his agent John Grant in April said: “Tim was one of the great actors of his generation.

“Much loved and admired by his peers, he will be remembered by many as a gentleman and a true friend. He will be much missed."

Following Mr Pigott-Smith's death, the production of Death of a Salesman has been postponed and will return to Northampton's Royal & Derngate Theatre in June.

Mr Pigott-Smith appeared in dozens of British television shows over his 50-year career, including Doctor Who, Midsomer Murders and Silent Witness. He also played Sir Philip Tapsell in ITV's Downton Abbey.

He was billed to star in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman at the Royal & Derngate Theatre.

He was well known for starring in the 1984 British serial drama The Jewel in the Crown, which The Guardian described as a 'high-water mark of 1980s British TV'.

In an interview with the Chronicle & Echo in the weeks before his death, Mr Pigott-Smith said: "I have been very lucky with the career that I have had, and the parts I have been asked to play.

“It is just a privilege to be a part of this show. I think it has the most wonderful quality."