Concorde nose cone plate found in car boot sale on auction in Northamptonshire next week

The plate of the Concorde nose cone was essential to allow the plane to land.
The plate of the Concorde nose cone was essential to allow the plane to land.

A piece of a Concorde found in a car boot sale will go to auction in Northamptonshire next week for an estimated £4,000.

A 'gasket plate' from the iconic Concorde droop nose cone is to be sold next week at auctioneers Humbert & Ellis Ltd, in Whittlebury.

The plate of Concorde 216 was discovered in a car boot sale 10 years ago.

The plate of Concorde 216 was discovered in a car boot sale 10 years ago.

The plate, measuring 124cm x 100cm was removed from Concorde number 216 - known in the day as Alpha Foxtrot or ‘Foxy’ - when it sustained damage in a collision with a hangar door at Heathrow airport in 1995.

Concorde 216 was the last of the seven British Concorde built for commercial service.

In its day, 216 flew 18,257 hours with 6045 landings. It flew 5,639 supersonic flights.

Now, the orginal plate from the nose cone, which turned up at a car boot sale in 2008, is expected to sell for between £4,000 and £6,000.

Auctioneer Jonathan Humbert said: "This is an extremely rare and iconic piece of aviation history and to hold something that has flown supersonically hundreds of times is amazing."

The plate is the part of hydraulic system which allows the nose to be moved from the cockpit. The aircraft would never have been certified if such a system was not included as the pilot would not have been able to see to land.

Concorde 216 was deregistered in 2004 and is now displayed at Aerospace Bristol. Its last flight was from Heathrow to Filton which included the iconic flight over Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol.

The sale takes place July 17 and can be viewed online at the Humbert and Ellis website.

Humbert & Ellis sold an unused Concorde nose cone in February 2018 for £63,000