Parish council fears residents could be at risk from Flore House wedding venue plans

A parish council and some residents of a village near Daventry are objecting to an application for a proposed wedding venue to be granted an alcohol and music licence.

Monday, 14th June 2021, 3:56 pm
Updated Monday, 14th June 2021, 3:58 pm
A view of Flore House. Picture: Photography by Mook.
A view of Flore House. Picture: Photography by Mook.

The application is for Flore House, a Grade II listed Jacobean hunting lodge in Flore, for live music, recorded music and the supply of alcohol for various times and days during the week.

The West Northamptonshire Licensing Sub Committee for the Daventry area is due to hear the application tomorrow (June 15).

Flore Parish Council is objecting on the grounds of the potential for environmental harm to neighbours and the wider village and noise and disturbance.

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The WN Council licensing statement states: 'The applicant is applying for a new premises licence for live music, recorded music and supply of alcohol.

'The residential house is where the applicant lives and she wishes to establish a wedding venue.

'Rooms are currently hired out as an Air BnB for paying guests, but they do not currently provide alcohol.

'These proposed licensable activities are all between 10am and midnight on some days in the summer, on lesser hours earlier in the week, and predominantly for events later in the week.

'When the words “open to the public” are mentioned in the licensable activities, it actually refers to when activities will be available to bona fide guests and residents who have pre-booked, not to the general public at large.

'I am sure that although the opening hours and licensable activities look extensive, the intention is for all of those activities to be limited to occasions when the business takes booking for weddings and parties, etc, only.

'It is not likely to be on a regular daily or even weekly basis, which it could appear to imply, from reading the application in isolation.'

A report to the committee states the applicant has proposed some conditions through the operating schedule which include: The personal licence holder and designated premises supervisor will always be on the premises - she is resident at the premises.

The designated premises supervisor will ensure there are always sufficient staff to manage events at the premises. They will also ensure staff receive regular training.

During events e.g. weddings, extra staff will be present, it is a contractual requirement that wedding planning co-ordinators are present throughout.

Sufficient staff will be present during an event to ensure there is no excessive noise or disturbance.

There will be restricted hours when entertainment is allowed and, where possible, there will be noise restrictions on equipment.

Regular noise checks inside and outside the premises will take place. Where possible speakers will face away from residential areas, and entertainers will be made aware of noise restrictions. People will be asked to leave the property quietly.

The report states there were 11 representations made. Parish council and residents' concerns are in relation to 'many different aspects of the application.'

These include the 'potential for increased traffic on the winding roads near the school and church; potential increase of drivers parking on the verges and footpaths; use of the single track lane by many different people which may be hazardous; potential for increased noise from many different sources and late into the evening.'