Residents rally together to help fund life saving defibrillator in Northampton district

Councillor, James Hill, Assistant Cabinet Member Regeneration, Enterprise and Planning.
Councillor, James Hill, Assistant Cabinet Member Regeneration, Enterprise and Planning.
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Residents from Rectory Farm are rallying together in a bid to fund a defibrillator for people who live in the district.

At the residents association meeting this month, chairman, Keith Holland-Delamere pitched the idea after a fellow resident said it would be a worth while cause to investigate as the air ambulance has had to land in the playing field a couple of times due to injuries, which have occurred during football matches.

Commenting after the meeting he told the Chron: “With over 1000 homes and nearby sports pitches, a school, shop and a community centre it seems to be an ideal location to take forward this idea. We never know when having a defibrillator nearby could save someone’s life.”

The defibrillator would cost up to £1200 and it has been suggested that it should be placed somewhere where it can be accessed 24 hours a day.

Assistant Cabinet Member Regeneration, Enterprise and Planning, Councillor James Hill said: “I would be fully behind and support the installation of a defibrillator in Rectory Farm.

“Around three years ago my father suffered a massive heart attack while on holiday. He was only saved because the hotel he was at had one and the staff were able to use it before paramedics arrived.

“After his recovery doctors informed us that without the machine being so close and to hand he would have certainly not survived. These machines can literally be the difference between life and death. I would urge all residents in Rectory Farm and surrounding area’s to get behind the Residents Association project to get one.”

The Rectory Farm residents association meeting represents Rectory Farm, Berrydale and The Bridleways.

Sara Askew, Head of Survival at the British Heart Foundation, said:“In the UK more than 30,000 people suffer a cardiac arrest outside of hospital every year but less than one in ten survive. More lives could be saved if more people were confident performing CPR and more defibrillators were available in public places.

Defibrillator picture from the British Heart Foundation

Defibrillator picture from the British Heart Foundation

“It’s fantastic that the community are rallying together to fund a public access defibrillator in the area – it could be the difference between life and death.

“We’re urging other communities and organisations up and down the country to join the British Heart Foundation in creating a Nation of Lifesavers by giving people the skills and confidence to save a life learning vital CPR skills and by making public access defibrillators more readily available across the UK.”