Roman villa may be buried in Northampton

Experts believe the remains of a Roman villa could be unearthed if a housing development in Northampton is allowed to be built.

The London-based Paddington Churches Housing Association has applied to build 108 new homes on wasteland in Booth Rise, Boothville.

In documents submitted with the group's plans for the land, experts from the Museum of London Archaeology service have said further evidence of a villa originally found during the 1930s could be unearthed.

The group's report said: "A Roman villa has been identified directly to the south of the site along with a potentially related settlement to the north.

"As such there is high potential for the survival of Roman remains on the site.

"Such remains could include parts of the villa itself, such as masonry walls or tessellated pavements, ancillary masonry or timber buildings. They would be of local or regional significance depending on their nature."

The remains of a Roman villa were found about 400ft away from the site during a previous excavation in 1938.

Stone walls, a mosaic floor, fragments of a skull, pieces of Roman pottery and Roman coins have also been found in the area.

Documents submitted to the West Northamptonshire Development Corporation (WNDC) by the Paddington Church Housing Association have said it is likely that any archaeological remains found within the site would be carefully removed.

The company has applied to build 96 houses and 12 flats on the site.

The plans will be considered by both Northampton Borough Council and the WNDC, but the WNDC will have the final say on whether the scheme should get the go-ahead.

A public meeting to discuss the plans has been organised by the Boothville Residents' Association for Tuesday, September 9, from 7.30pm at the Boothville Community Centre in Booth Lane North.