'Roads are just as dangerous as the day our Beccy died', say Northamptonshire parents

Beccy Taylor, who was 18 when she died.
Beccy Taylor, who was 18 when she died.
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A mum and dad who lost their daughter to a car accident in Northamptonshire say the county's major roads are not being inspected properly.

Beccy Taylor, aged 18, from Northampton, died in September 2008, after she dropped her sister off at school.

She was driving home along Towcester Road between Milton Malsor and Blisworth when she hit surface water on the road and lost control of her car.

After narrowly missing two other vehicles, Beccy's car clipped a kerb and spun into the path of a car travelling the other way.

Her mum and dad,Nicole and Chris, said they are now extremely disappointed to find the condition of major routes in the county deteriorating.

Mr Taylor said: "Every year we have reported blocked gullies and flooding on the A4500, A508 or Towcester Road.

" In November last year every nearly every gulley on the A4500 between Earls Barton and Wilby was blocked.

Mrs Taylor said that, as a result of their persistence, the flooding which caused Beccy's death has stopped. However, they remain concerned that the inspection regime by the county council's highways partner KierWSP does not pick up defects, such as potholes.

Mrs Taylor said: "The inspections on this road are performed from a car travelling at around 40mph.

"We have complained so many times to KierWSP about their inspection regime but, other than reporting defects on Street Doctor, we can only communicate via NCC's legal department - who note our correspondence and take no action.

"We appreciate we may be dismissed as grieving parents, but we remain concerned by the number of deaths on Northamptonshire's roads."

A spokesman for Northamptonshire County Council said: “Our thoughts are with the family of Rebecca Taylor who have suffered from the dreadful loss of a loved one.

“Our Street Doctor service, available on the county council website, is also available to report any highways defect, if any problems occur between inspections.

“Additionally, all of our roads are monitored and collision data analysed to look for any spikes in numbers of collisions, so any potential problem areas can quickly be identified.”