Plans for student accommodation block in Kingsthorpe area of Northampton rejected

The Old Bective Works, Bective Road. The buildings have been ear marked for student accomodation and an underground car park. ENGNNL00120110823183453
The Old Bective Works, Bective Road. The buildings have been ear marked for student accomodation and an underground car park. ENGNNL00120110823183453

Plans to build a 293-flat student accommodation block on the site of a former shoe factory have been rejected by Northampton Borough Council’s planning committee.

The proposal, which was put forward by Pelican Real Estate Limited and David Lock Associates, was to knock down the Bective Works factory in Kingsthorpe and build a new apartment block, which would house up to 331 students.

The building would include a number of “communal areas,” a cafe and a small retail unit accessible from Yelvertoft Road.

However, the plans were rejected by the planning committee at a meeting last night, despite the fact it was recommended for approval by officers.

A number of residents and businesses lodged 28 letters of objection against the scheme, complaining the plans provide too few parking places at 34 and would lead to increased noise, nuisance and littering in the area.

Objector Emma Bellamy wrote: “The fact is there will always be some students who have little or no respect the community they temporarily reside in.”

She added: “There seems to be an assumption that due to the design of the building, students will gather inside rather than outside, but this is a very naive view.”

MP for Northampton North, Michael Ellis, also questioned the need for the scheme, when the University of Northampton is soon set to relocate to a new campus in the Waterside Enterprise Zone.

Two previous applications to build student accommodation on the Bective Works site have been refused in recent years.

A 2014 bid by the same developers for a 320-flat block was turned down by Northampton Borough Council because its proposed 17-metre height was described as “unduly bulky.”

The current application was recommended for approval because officers believed it had “overcome the previously identified issues.”