Northampton's ambulance service trains 150 students to perform CPR for 'Restart a Heart Day'

Year 7 pupils at The Duston School yesterday (October 16) learned how to save a life by performing CPR.
Year 7 pupils at The Duston School yesterday (October 16) learned how to save a life by performing CPR.

Students in Northampton have been trained in how to perform CPR on someone in cardiac arrest, as part of a national campaign organised by the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the British Heart Foundation.

In a life-threatening emergency, every second counts and chest compressions keep oxygen flowing around the patient’s body increasing their chance of survival.

Within their groups, children, paramedics and volunteers used dummies to act out cardio pulmonary resuscitation.

Within their groups, children, paramedics and volunteers used dummies to act out cardio pulmonary resuscitation.

As part of national campaign, 'Restart a Heart Day' East Midlands Ambulance Service donated free dummy training kits to The Duston School - as well as three other secondary schools in Northamptonshire - in a bid to teach them how to save a life.

Community response manager, Mandy Lowe, has worked for East Midlands Ambulance Service for 33 years.

She said: "Any child can learn CPR, the younger the better, they have not always got the full mechanics of being able to jump up and down on an adults chest, but they can learn the skills and they can coach parents and any other adults that are there.

"Every time someone is off the chest, their chances of survival diminish by 10 percent so even if a child jumps up and down on a chest and gets something going and some blood and some oxygen around the body, you're buying us a bit of time really."

The five sessions taught 150 science pupils at The Duston School where to place their hands , how far to push down and what rhythm to use when making attempts to use cardio pulmonary resuscitation.

A survey of people in the East Midlands found that only 41 per cent of people would feel confident giving CPR to a stranger and 19 per cent of people were able to identify the two signs of a cardiac arrest, which is when someone is not breathing or not breathing normally, and that they have collapsed and are unresponsive.