DCSIMG

Northampton grandmother who suffered serious injuries during a town centre bus crash is trying to trace good Samaritan

Susan Buck was involved in a bus crash outside the new bus station. She will need six months of treatment and surgery on her knee.
Susan is pictured with her husband Robin Buck. NNL-140209-162421009

Susan Buck was involved in a bus crash outside the new bus station. She will need six months of treatment and surgery on her knee. Susan is pictured with her husband Robin Buck. NNL-140209-162421009

 

A charity worker who suffered serious injuries when the bus she was on was in a collision with a car. is trying to trace the good Samaritan who helped her after the incident.

Susan Buck was travelling on the Number 16 Parklands bus on Friday, August 15, when, within minutes of it leaving North Gate bus station, it was involved in a collision with a car.

The force of the impact threw her out of her chair so hard she fractured a leg and badly chipped a bone in a knee, leaving her needing surgery.

But while she drifted in and out of consciousness, a friendly fellow passenger helped comfort her.

All 63-year-old grandmother-of-eight Mrs Buck remembers of the woman is that she was “manager of a care home in Kingsthorpe”.

Mrs Buck said: “I was catapulted to the floor and I was out cold for a while.

“I just remember that a lady came to help me.

“I would like to find out who she was. She sat with me and helped me with my breathing. She stayed with me until paramedics arrived.

“I just want to meet her so I can thank her.”

Mrs Buck, who works at the Mind charity shop in Kingsthorpe, might not be able to work for the next six months and said she was still suffering flashbacks of the incident.

“I remember hearing this huge bang,” she said. “I genuinely thought a bomb had gone off.

“I remember the kind woman grabbing me a brown paper bag [to breathe in] because I was having a panic attack. To be honest I was worried I wasn’t going to make it.”

Mrs Buck’s story comes a week after business leaders and bus station users called for more to be done to make the road network safer around the North Gate area.

She believed the tight roads there were too congested and, as a result, likely to lead to more collisions.

She agreed with claims a 5mph limit would help make the area safer for both bus passengers and pedestrians.

“That road is so busy, an accident was always going to happen around the bus station,” she said. “I just wish it hadn’t happened to me.

“I really think something needs to be done around there.”

And to the borough and county councils she said: “They’ve got to realise that road system is a nightmare.

“This is people’s lives we are talking about.”

Mrs Buck was treated on the number 16 bus for an hour-and-a-half on August 15 and said she felt glad to be alive.

But she says her injuries and the following surgery to have a metal plate put in her leg will have a major impact on her life.

Mrs Buck, who is in almost constant pain and needs regular injections to stop her blood clotting, would usually go to the gym three times a week and spend two days working at the Mind charity shop, where she would meet a lot of her friends.

But with the injured left leg set to be in a plaster cast for the next eight weeks and her husband having to take time off work to give her her regular injections, her life has been turned upside down, she said.

“The stuffing has been knocked out of me,” she said.

“I’ve got to suffer now for the next six months. Everything has been put on hold until then.”

Now she feels it is time the installation of seatbelts was made mandatory on buses, as her injuries could have been reduced had she not been ‘catapulted’ after the impact, she said.

“Where I was sitting I bore the full brunt of the impact.” she said.

“I just don’t understand why, if you are on a coach or in a car, you have to wear a seatbelt but you can stand up on a bus.

“It just doesn’t make sense.”

 

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