Manager and senior nurse of Northamptonshire care home to face conduct hearing over broken windows and ‘scalding’ shower water

A manager and senior nurse at the Foxhill Manor care home are to face a conduct hearing. The charges follow a damning CQC inspection in 2014.

A manager and senior nurse at the Foxhill Manor care home are to face a conduct hearing. The charges follow a damning CQC inspection in 2014.

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Two senior staff at a Northamptonshire care home are to face a competency hearing after the premises was found with broken windows and hot taps pouring out scalding water.

Manager Ramsamy Nullatamby and senior nurse Clency Meurier have been called to face a week-long hearing at the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) offices in London, on July 18.

They are charged with “failing to ensure a clean, safe and acceptable environment” was provided to residents at Foxhill Manor Nursing Home in Foxhill Road, West Haddon, from an unknown date up until July 9, 2014.

They are also both charged with failing to ensure that a proper system of recording and care planning was in place at the home, “prior to the intervention of Nurse A” in approximately February 2013.

The NMC describes both as having been in a “position of responsibility for the operations at Foxhill Manor” and the hearing will consider both registered nurses’ fitness to practise.

A report by the Care Quality Commision (CQC) in July 2014, described Mr Nullatamby as being in “day-to-day control of the regulated activities at the care home,” which at the time had 26 beds for elderly people with degenerative conditions such as dementia.

However the damning CQC report demanded “urgent action” be taken over its findings after the home failed to meet five out of seven key standards.

The condition of the premises came under particular fire.

Two of the bedrooms on the second floor had broken windows and one of the bathroom doors was hanging off its hinges, the CQC inspectors found in June 2014.

Hot water from the second floor shower and ground floor bathroom was found to be a scalding risk at between 54 and 56 degrees Celcius and a cooker “was unsafe but they had continued to use it.”