Man who committed murder in Northampton should have been in prison in Latvia

Igors Kolkunovs (left), aged 27,  and Vladlens Ignashko (right), aged 40 have both been given life prison sentences after they were found guilty of killing Olegs Sergejevs, aged 38, in their flat in Cliftonville Court on April 9 this year.

Igors Kolkunovs (left), aged 27, and Vladlens Ignashko (right), aged 40 have both been given life prison sentences after they were found guilty of killing Olegs Sergejevs, aged 38, in their flat in Cliftonville Court on April 9 this year.

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A Latvian man should have been in prison in his home country when he murdered a man in Northampton, a court heard.

Vladlens Ignashko, aged 40 and Igors Kolkunovs, aged 27, have both been given life prison sentences after they were found guilty of killing Olegs Sergejevs, aged 38, in their flat in Cliftonville Court on April 9 this year.

A jury also unanimously convicted the pair of the attempted murder of Denis Segodins, aged 32, who was in the flat at the time of the murder.

Northampton Crown Court heard the four men were all drinking together for more than five hours when Ignashko and Kolkunovs felt they had been insulted by Sergejevs.

Judge Rupert Mayo, sentencing, said the pair reacted in a “sinister, evil and brutal way” by punching and kicking Mr Sergejevs to the floor, aiming up to 20 kicks to his head.

Forensic Scientist, Judith Cunnison, stated that in the hallway of the address there was blood spatter on the walls with over 200 spots of blood present together with a large area of bloodstained carpet.

Murder victim Oleg Sergejevs

Murder victim Oleg Sergejevs

As Mr Sergejevs lay dying in the hallway of the flat Ignashko and Kolkunovs turned their attention to Mr Segodins and used a knife to “threaten and humiliate” him.

The court heard that, at one point, Mr Segodins pleaded with them to stab him in the throat to end his life quickly.

But in what Judge Mayo described as “sadist behaviour” Segodins was allowed to use the bathroom in between the assaults on him.

During the trial it was revealed that a series of phone calls were made by the defendants to a witness during which he was told that they needed help to dispose of two bodies and that they were busy cleaning up blood.

The court heard that Ignashko had a series of previous convictions from his time in Latvia and there was a European warrant out for his arrest in relation to a shooting that injured a man in January 2013.

In January this year, an order was released by a Latvian court recalling him to prison to serve a five-year prison sentence.

Today (Thursday), Judge Mayo sentenced Ignashko to life in prison for the murder of Olegs Sergejevs. He must serve a minimum of 17 years.

He was also given a life sentence for attempted murder. He must serve a minimum of seven years. He will serve both sentences concurrently.

Kolkunovs was also given a life sentence for the murder of Olegs Sergejevs. He must serve a minimum of 14 and-a-half years.

He was also given a life sentence for attempted murder and must serve a minimum of six years. He will serve both sentences concurrently.

Detective Sergeant Paul Hamilton, from the East Midlands Major Crime Team, said: “We are pleased with the verdict of the court in finding both men guilty of murder and attempted murder and with the sentences handed out by the judge.

“The reason behind this incident appears to be a drunken insult which has resulted in a vicious and sustained attack on two men leading to the death of Olegs Sergejevs and serious injuries to the second victim who is lucky to be alive today.

“The consumption of excessive alcohol has been the main contributory factor in this case.

“I would like to thank the jury for their patience and concentration shown throughout this lengthy five week trial.

“This was a needless loss of life which has left a wife distraught, together with two children who will now grow up without a father.”

In a statement, Mr Sergejevs’ wife said life will never be the same again for her and her two daughters.

She said: “The phone call to say he was no longer alive and also that he had been killed was heartbreaking. My life stopped at that point. I have difficulty sleeping and still cannot remove his clothes from the wardrobe.

“Olegs was a remarkable man and father. I feel guilty that we were living apart. We had agreed a few weeks before his death that Olegs would return to Ireland and to his family.”