Flytippers dump 17 bags of rubbish outside Northampton jewellers to avoid tip journey

Wesley Suter, of Steffans jewellers, pictured earlier this month following issues with rubbish being left near his shop
Wesley Suter, of Steffans jewellers, pictured earlier this month following issues with rubbish being left near his shop

A businessman has called for an end to Northampton borough Council’s stand-off with flytippers that has seen 17 bin bags of rubbish dumped outside his shop.

The council said it is now refusing to collect household waste not in its official green bags.

Wesley Suter, of Steffans jewellers in Abington Square, said it has resulted in residents living in the York Road area flytipping bags near a public bin.

While he doesn’t condone their behaviour, Mr Suter said it is pointless the council ignoring the problem.

He said: “People who have used their green bags are either faced with a trip to the rubbish dump every week or finding somewhere else to put it.

“I’m not saying it’s right but the council has to respond. The bags have been there a week and are disgusting and it will affect all our businesses.”

The complaint comes after a woman living in The Mounts was told by the council’s waste department to take her rubbish to the tip in her car from now on after she ran out of green bags.

Householders without green bags for whatever reason have been using shop-bought bin liners since 2013 when the rule was introduced with the aim of limiting the amount of waste sent to landfill.

Despite the rule, black bags were seemingly still being collected on the whole until the council took a hard line in the past week.

Since the two sack policy was introduced in 2013, Northampton Borough Council has sent out around 3,000 warning letters to residents who are not complying and issued 55 fixed penalty notices. In addition the council has successfully prosecuted eight household for waste offences.

Councillor Alan Bottwood, Northampton Borough Council cabinet member for the environment, said: “This policy isn’t new and there is no reason for households not to comply. Every household is provided with a supply of green sacks every six months, enough to last six months.”