Charity man gives up job in sales to sing for the elderly at care homes in Northampton

Carl Garrood.

Carl Garrood.

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A former director of sales has given up the corporate world and is starting up a charity to recruit singers to perform old time classics for people with Alzheimers and dementia.

Former sales and marketing boss, Carl Garrood, 57, of Kingsthorpe started singing at care homes in Leicestershire when his mother fell poorly three years ago.

Spurred on by the "amazing results" he saw in his audience as well as the feedback from care home staff, Carl is now dedicating more of his time to the project after moving to Northampton shortly after.

Carl, who performs under the stage name 'Roadman', is setting up a charity called 'Keep Care Homes Live' to recruit performers in the county to help lift spirits of those who live in care.

He said: "The frustrating thing is, music has clearly got an answer to Alzehimers in terms of accessing the memory, but who is doing anything?

"When residents have entertainment they calm down straight away, and they look forward to it."

"Music helps people with Alzheimer's and dementia remember things."

Carl currently tours 15 care homes in Northampton and will host a charity event once every month to fund his tour.

"You know when you go to work, it can be quite difficult, but everyone is happy to see me here, they always ask 'when are you coming back'?

"Fundamentally for me this is something I like doing and they really appreciate it.

"My background is sales and marketing, I have designed a business model, the charity is a way to raise money, like a free gig agency.

"I go round to care homes now and I can see the problems and the difficulties."

Carl performs at Oak Lodge Care Home in Duston atleast once a month.

Care home manager, Elen Abrahart said: "He brings memories to the residents, he is very, very supportive in encouraging residents to give feedback.

"He comes as often as he can, we would love him in here once or twice a week but we usually get him once or twice a month.

"Residents out there were born in the fifties and sixties, they like the upbeat songs and the staff love it, they can see the residents are gaining something from it."