Anti-flytipping tactics are not working on Northampton estate, says resident

Wayde Rathbone is trying to get measures put in place to curb fly-tippers from targetting an area near his home in Briarhill.
Wayde Rathbone is trying to get measures put in place to curb fly-tippers from targetting an area near his home in Briarhill.

A Northampton homeowner says council measures to curb fly-tipping in his estate have done nothing to prevent dumpers - and now he wants the authority to rethink its strategy.

Last year Wayde Rathbone, of The Briars, in Briarhill, asked for CCTV to be installed around the estate after it became increasingly used a dumping ground.

Just some of the waste dumped in the Briarhill area, seen on the morning of Wednesday, August 6.

Just some of the waste dumped in the Briarhill area, seen on the morning of Wednesday, August 6.

He was fed up having to call Northampton Borough Council every time items such as shopping trolleys, large tyres and mattresses appeared on the grassy parcels of land around the Briars.

Last August his repeated calls to the council, which he said began around 10 years ago, appeared to have paid off, after the authority installed signs deterring tippers across the estate.

It also put cameras in Mr Rathbone’s home in a bid to catch offenders.

But Mr Rathbone, a web company project designer, 49, says the signs are not prominent enough and the cameras were only fitted in his home for a fortnight.

Tyres, curtain poles and buckets are strewn across a patch of land behind the Briars, Briarhill.

Tyres, curtain poles and buckets are strewn across a patch of land behind the Briars, Briarhill.

He said: “I don’t think they were there long enough, and I don’t think they prosecuted anybody because of them, it just wasn’t enough.

“We ware getting stuff dumped out there all time.

“Yesterday there was a hamster cage, there was a load of old tee-shirts and some glass.”

Mr Rathbone says the Briars is one of many estates to have suffered since the council’s environmental services contractor Enterprise began strictly enforcing two bin-bag collection policy.

It means that the area is strewn with rubbish after collection days because a lot of people put out waste in non-regulation bin liners, or in no bin-liner at all.

But Mr Rathbone says there could be solutions.

He said: “I understand a lot of people do dump their rubbish, but the council need to arrange a day when trucks come round and pick up all of the stuff that has been left out.

“A lot of this would also be solved if we had wheelie bins, and the street cleaners need to come round here more often. I think I must have seen them twice this year, I might be wrong.”

Councillor Alan Bottwood, Northampton Borough Council cabinet member for the environment, said he shares Mr Rathbone’s “frustrations” about the Briars.

He said: “The site continues to be monitored on a regular basis by the local neighbourhood warden and our partner Enterprise continues to clear reported fly-tipping.

“Warning signs indicating that the site is under surveillance for fly-tipping have been put in place in the area.

“We have also monitored the site using CCTV cameras on two occasions but unfortunately this did not produce any evidence for enforcement action.

“The neighbourhood warden will continue to visit the area and we would like to urge residents to contact us if they witness fly-tipping to enable us to take appropriate enforcement action against the perpetrators.

“Members of the public can report fly-tipping through our website at www.northampton.gov.uk/report-it, by phone on 0300 330 7000, by email at contact@northampton.gov.uk or through iPhone and Android apps at www.northampton.gov.uk/app.”