'A monstrous venture': Delayed 3,000 homes plan in Northampton faces strong opposition

Dallington Grange proposal pictures.

Dallington Grange proposal pictures.

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Nearly three years since developers revealed their intentions to build 3,000 homes near Kings Heath, plans have been resubmitted to erect three schools, six shops, a pub

In a design and access statement prepared by Pegasus Group, the proposed development boasts an opportunity for the provision of a new secondary school as well as two new primary schools set within the 3,000 houses in Dallington Grange, which promises to create employment opportunities for residents.

But the move had been greatly delayed over a dispute over where the access roads should go.

One of many to object, Steven Antipolo said: "After studying the proposals I am somewhat bemused by how many points of access are proposed. There is one to the east of Mill Lane that’s acceptable, no great inconvenience to anyone and another on the new build west corridor off Harlestone Road and then from those several points of access to the estate thereafter.

"I strongly object to the plans as they are, access via existing residential sites needs to come off the plans as it is not needed. I didn’t see any plans which suggested a benefit to these access points to residents of Dallington Grange or either Ryehill or Kings Heath. Nice, surely this is true in some cases but not essential to the point of requiring the level of change and disruption required."

In a planning statement amendment submitted on March 31, Pegasus Group said: "The proposed development remains similar in nature and scale to that originally submitted but there have been some changes in response to consultation comments received.

"[An] amendment to red line boundary to include a vehicular access onto Medway Drive, Kings Heath to serve up to 100 dwellings," as well as a "revised location of the southern primary school so as to be co-located with the secondary school."

Resident Yvonne Lamb, said: "I am greatly against this as all around that area is a wildlife and horse habitat and to build such a monstrous venture would be an insult to what bit of green land we have left for our visual entertainment.

"So, therefore, I strongly oppose this planning proposal. We already have Kings Heath, Kingsthorpe, St James and the town centre, as well as Harlestone Manor, so why do we need to destroy this area for another urban site when we have enough throughout this town for residents to choose."

The proposals, which have been greatly delayed, also say how there will be a new sports playing fields, a food store, a restaurant or cafe (which one is to be decided), a hot food takeaway and a pub.

Another resident who opposes plans said: "The back of the bungalow my mum resides in is directly on the proposed application's boundary line, which means proposed developments will affect my mum directly - and in my opinion lower her quality of life and affect her care and ability to live safely in her home."

"Currently, my mum is safe in this little cul-de-sac 'haven' of Nene Drive bungalows allocated to vulnerable tenants. It is an oasis of peace and security. It is cruel that after taking two years to get the back adapted for mum to be able to get out and enjoy some fresh air in her garden, as she has become vitamin D deficient, she now has to contend with the upheaval of living next to what will effectively be a construction site opposite her back garden for the foreseeable future.

"Moreover, if the proposed building goes ahead it will effectively change the area she lives in to the extent it will lower her quality of life."

The developers want to "enhance the existing public transport network by providing a high-quality replacement or extended bus services through the site and with a good service frequency" the statement says. "The majority of allocated parking will be provided on the plot."